Video

We are actively working on posting videos of our past programs. Check back regularly for new additions.


New Winston Museum “Music in W-S” Salon Series – Thursday November 17, 2016

Music, The Brain, & Medicine

In addition to being a clinical neuroradiologist, he has studied the brain using functional MRI for the past 20 years. He is an avid supporter of the local music scene, currently serving on the Board of Directors of Piedmont Opera, previously serving on the Board of the Winston-Salem Symphony, and currently learning all he can about American music from Western North Carolina. His daughters are the local bluegrass/Celtic/rock band The Dan River Girls.

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Veterans and the Healing Power of Storytelling – Thursday November 10, 2016

How can stories heal? With a focus on military veterans, this lively presentation invites the audience to experience the power of storytelling in the healing process. As veterans make up nearly 10% of North Carolina’s population, this conversation is both timely and necessary. Combat veterans in particular may come home with unseen scars that take a lifetime to heal. Sharing stories with caring others can help lift the burden of war.
In honor of Veterans’ Day on November 11th, this program features Cyndi Briggs, professor of counseling and oral historian, Jacinta White, poet and founder of the Word Project, and Don Timmons, Vietnam veteran and Community Partnership & Veteran Support Coordinator with Hospice and Palliative Care Center’s We Honor Veterans program.

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New Winston Museum “Music in W-S” Salon Series – Thursday October 27, 2016

The WS Symphony @70: Stories from the Stage

Music Director and Conductor Robert Moody, along with a panel of current and former Winston-Salem Symphony musicians, discuss their experiences both on stage and off as the Symphony celebrates its 70th anniversary season.

The Symphony grew out of a small group of musicians who performed together regularly for special programs and played its first concert in 1947 to an overflow audience at Salem College’s Memorial Hall. 70 years later, the Winston-Salem Symphony has become one of the Southeast’s most highly regarded regional orchestras. Learn about the early years of the Symphony, stories of memorable concerts with internationally acclaimed artists such as James Galway, Joshua Bell, and Yo-Yo Ma, and backstage ‘secrets’ of the Symphony from its 70 year history!

Joining the conversation are the following musicians:
Anita Cirba, Principal Trumpet player
Dr. William McCall, former violinist, board member, and longtime Symphony subscriber and supporter
Tim Papenbrock, Horn
Ron Rudkin, Clarinet

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New Winston Museum “Music in W-S” Salon Series – Thursday September 22, 2016

From Banjos to Blues: The Music of Early Winston

Richard Emmett of the Blue Ridge Music Center moderates a lively and entertaining discussion with gifted local performers and music historians about the musical history of our community. Featured panelists include: Elizabeth Carlson, Steve Terrill, Bob Carlin, and Big Ron Hunter.

From the collision of African and European styles, to the racial segregation of musicians, to genres enforced by record companies, the music of the American South has a rich history. Host to an ever-increasing number of musicians, the music scene in newly incorporated Winston-Salem was no exception.

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New Winston Museum “Music in W-S” Salon Series – Thursday August 25, 2016

The Music of Moravian Salem

Erik Salzwedel from the Moravian Music Foundation shares insights into Salem’s earliest musical traditions and their importance in the everyday lives of Moravian settlers.

Winston-Salem’s unique musical history is even older than the United States itself. In the woods of the Wachovia tract on the North Carolina frontier, Salem’s Moravian settlers played and composed music that would not have been out of place in the great concert halls of Europe.

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New Winston Museum “Civil Rights Activism” Salon Series – Thursday June 23, 2016

The Winston-Salem Black Panther Party

Our final segment of our Salon Series discussion on Civil Rights activism in Winston-Salem features speakers formerly affiliated with the Black Panther Party.

The Winston-Salem chapter of the Black Panther Party was born organically out of the ashes of earlier civil rights groups. When the group of activists that would eventually become the Winston-Salem Panthers first started organizing, they were not formally associated with the national Black Panther Party. Even before they became officially affiliated in 1971, the Winston-Salem Panthers were engaging in some of the same community-building and self-defense activities as other chapters of the Party. The ultimate aim of the Black Panther Party was to improve the lives of local Black people socially, politically, legally, and otherwise.

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New Winston Museum “Civil Rights Activism” Salon Series – Thursday May 26, 2016

School Integration

This is the second part of our Salon Series discussion on Civil Rights activism in Winston-Salem. Special guests will be Daisy Chambers, the first Black teacher on the faculty at Clemmons Elementary in 1964; Ms. Norma Corley, one of three Black students assigned to integrate the formerly all-white Easton Elementary School in 1958; and Dr. Kenneth Simington, a student at Carver Elementary School in 1970 and currently the assistant superintendent for instructional and student services with WSFC Schools. The final program in the series is on June 23rd and will focus on the Black Panthers movement in Winston-Salem.

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New Winston Museum Exhibition Programming – Thursday May 12, 2016

Union Station: Past, Present & Future

In recognition of Historic Preservation Month and our exhibition, “Planes, Trains, and Automobiles,” this panel discussion explores the history and future plans for Winston-Salem’s 1926 Union Station building. Local train expert, Dr. Jeff Miller, is joined by Michelle Portman Walter, project manager with Walter Robbs architecture, and Carol Davis of the S. G. Atkins CDC. As the historic property undergoes an exciting restoration, the program takes a look at what lies ahead for the building and the surrounding area. Michelle McCullough from the City of Winston-Salem moderates.

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New Winston Museum “Civil Rights Activism” Salon Series – Thursday April 28, 2016

Local 22 and Tobacco Unionism

Our 2nd quarter 2016 Salon Series theme is “Civil Rights Activism in Winston-Salem.” On April 28th, we hosted a panel discussion featuring Dr. Robert Korstad (author of Civil Rights Unionism) and Richard Koritz (son of Philip Koritz, Director of Local 22 of the FTA-CIO).  The program includes a special focus on the union’s interactions with the local police department and the criminal justice system.  The discussion is moderated by Alex Harris, a Salem College student and North Carolina native.

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New Winston Museum Exhibition Programming – Thursday April 14, 2016

Transportation Iconography in African American Art

Dr. Alison Fleming, Associate Professor of Art History at Winston-Salem State University, discusses the significance of transportation iconography in the artwork of John Biggers and other Southern African American artists. Three Biggers prints, on loan from Delta Arts Center, will be on display at New Winston Museum from April 11th through April 30th.

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New Winston Museum “Disabilities” Salon Series – Thursday, March 24, 2016

Friend or Foes: Winston-Salem’s Shades of Gray

Our 1st quarter 2016 Salon Series theme is “Out of the Shadows–Illuminating Disabilities.” This program focuses on how local institutions impact those living with disabilities. Panelists include representatives from The Centers for Exceptional Children, The Enrichment Center, Winston-Salem Industries for the Blind, and The Adaptables Center for Independent Living.

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New Winston Museum Exhibition Programming – Thursday, February 11, 2016

The Piedmont Way: A Corporate Culture for Success

In conjunction with our current exhibition, Frank Elliott, author of “Piedmont: Flight of the Pacemaker” joins with former Piedmont Airlines representatives Robert Reed and Cherryl Hartman to discuss Piedmont’s corporate culture as exemplified by the leadership of Piedmont founder Tom Davis.

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New Winston Museum Exhibition Programming – Thursday, February 11, 2016

Safe Bus: Driving Forward

In conjunction with our current exhibition, we present a panel discussion about the historic Safe Bus Company. Safe Bus was an African-American owned and operated transportation service that flourished in Winston-Salem during Jim Crow, and eventually became the the largest African-American owned transportation business in the world. Tina L. Carson-Wilkins of the Winston-Salem Transit Authority shares her research on the creation of Safe Bus Company and its impact on our community, and several former Safe Bus employees share their personal stories.

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New Winston Museum “Disabilities” Salon Series – Thursday, January 28, 2016

Institution to Revolution: The Dark Days

Our 1st quarter 2016 Salon Series theme is “Out of the Shadows–Illuminating Disabilities.” Bryan Dooley, Winston-Salem resident and national disability advocate, begins the series with, “Institution to Revolution: The Dark Days,” a review of life before the Americans with Disabilities Act and a personal account of his family’s journey as early beneficiaries of the ADA. Check out Bryan’s blog, Observations from Below, on Huffington Post.

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New Winston Museum Exhibition Programming – Wednesday, January 13, 2016

Built for Speed

In collaboration with Triad Stage and the Winston Cup Museum, NWM hosted “Built for Speed: Motor Sports in the Triad,” a panel discussion on the past, present, and future of regional motor sports. Our panel included Loren Pinilis of Bowman Gray Stadium Racing; Will Spencer of the Winston Cup Museum; Danny Lawrence of Richard Childress Racing; veteran NASCAR driver, Ed Berrier; and Janet Allard, author of Vrooommm!, a NAScomedy. The program was moderated by longtime NASCAR broadcaster Mark Garrow.

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New Winston Museum “Transportation” Salon Series – Thursday, December 17, 2015

Sisters in Flight!

Our final transportation-themed discussion sheds light on Piedmont Airlines’ female pioneers. Former Piedmont pilots Sandy Gitter and Connie Tobias, and former Piedmont flight attendant Nancy Robinson share memories of the early days of women flying the friendly skies. Our special guest moderator is historian and Dean of Wake Forest University, Dr. Michele Gillespie!

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New Winston Museum “Transportation” Salon Series – Thursday, November 19, 2015

All Aboard!

Our second transportation-themed discussion is all about trains. Local train expert, Dr. Jeff Miller shares his perspective on the impact of the railroad on the development of Winston-Salem, with particular emphasis on the locally-run Winston-Salem Southbound railway.

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New Winston Museum “Transportation” Salon Series – Thursday, October 22, 2015

Cruising in the Twin City

The Museum’s fourth quarter 2015 Salon Series focuses on the transportation and its impact on the development of the Winston-Salem community. From cruising down Stratford Road to young lovers parking on secluded back roads, master storyteller Fam Brownlee shares insights on the role of the automobile on the lives of teenagers in our city’s history.

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New Winston Museum “Immigration” Salon Series – Wednesday, August 12, 2015

Hispanic/Latino Immigration

The final program in the museum’s “Immigration” Salon Series is a discussion with Mari Jo Turner, Executive Director of the Hispanic League of Winston-Salem, and Carolina Ovando, a local student and Mexican child of Mexican immigrants. Through this conversation, they provide perspective on the increasing cultural diversity in the community. Along with discussing the growth and impact of the Latino/Hispanic populations on Winston-Salem as a whole, the conversation focuses on the experiences of the undocumented members of those populations.

The discussion took place at the Forsyth County Public Library Southside Branch.

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New Winston Museum “Medicine” Salon Series – Thursday, June 25, 2015

What is Biotech

You’ve heard all about Innovation Quarter and that Winston-Salem has become a leader in Biotech and Biomedical research, but what exactly does that mean? The third and final of our “medicine” focused Salon Series events aims to answer that question. Eric Tomlinson, President of Innovation Quarter, will join us to explain exactly what is going on in Winston-Salem’s old tobacco district.

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New Winston Museum “Medicine” Salon Series – Thursday, April 23, 2015

America’s First Medicinal Gardens

The Museum’s second quarter Salon Series will focus on the role of medicine in our community. Kicking off the subject will be a discussion on the medicinal garden at Bethabara Park, which was the first of its kind in the country. In the last couple years, local master gardeners, led by Harriet McCarthy, have meticulously restored the garden. The Bethabara garden is based on the oldest-known plan for a medical garden in the country and includes many unusual plants and several that are difficult — or even illegal — to grow, such as opium poppies. Harriet McCarthy will share some of this history behind the garden and its significance in Wachovia.

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New Winston Museum “Tobacco” Salon Series – Thursday, March 26, 2015

The Winston-Salem Medicis

Wrapping up our 2015 Salon Series on “Tobacco” and its role in developing this community, local artist and former director of Reynolda House Museum of American Art, Nicholas Burton Bragg, and current Reynolda House Programming Director, Phil Archer, give insight into the role that tobacco wealth played in supporting local arts and philanthropy. Dr. Mike Wakeford, Division of Liberal Arts faculty at UNC School of the Arts, moderates.

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New Winston Museum “Tobacco” Salon Series – Thursday, March 5, 2015

Tobacco Unionism and Civil Rights

Continuing our 2015 Salon Series on “Tobacco” and its role in developing this community, State Senator Earline Parmon and local expert Will Cox lead a discussion regarding the links between Winston-Salem’s tobacco unionism and the growth of political and Civil Rights activism that followed.

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New Winston Museum & This School, This City – Wednesday, February 4, 2015

Strings of Connection

In connection with our current exhibition, “This School, This City,” this program features guitar performance and historical reflection about five decades of the UNCSA Guitar Program and its relationship with greater Winston-Salem’s guitar culture. Featuring student guitarists from the studio of Joe Pecoraro and guitar program alumni.

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New Winston Museum & This School, This City – Saturday, January 24, 2015

Zero-to-Fifty

In connection with our current exhibition, “This School, This City,” an original piece of historical theater in honor of UNCSA’s 50th Anniversary. Written and performed as a one-man show by UNCSA School of Drama Studio IV actor Andrew Manning. This “workshop” style performance gave visitors a chance to learn more about the dramatic process and inspiration for Andrew’s work.

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New Winston Museum “Tobacco” Salon Series – Thursday, January 22, 2015

Tobacco from Jamestown to Winston-Salem

Kicking off our 2015 Salon Series will be 3 events that take a look at “Tobacco” and its role in developing this community. On January 22nd, Elizabeth Chew, the Betsy Main Babcock Director of the Curatorial and Education Division at Reynolda House Museum of American Art, outlined tobacco in America from Jamestown to RJ Reynolds, providing us with the background of an industry that has played such a significant role in shaping Winston-Salem.

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New Winston Museum Salon Series – Thursday, November 20, 2014

Meharry Medical College and the Impact on the African-American Community in Winston-Salem

This special panel discussion was hosted by NWM’s collaborative partners, the Society for the Study of Afro-American History. Founded in 1876 as the Medical Department of Central Tennessee College, Meharry Medical College was the first medical school in the South for African Americans. Many graduates of Meharry began their professional careers at the Kate B. Reynolds Memorial Hospital for African Americans (which became the third largest hospital for African Americans in the United States in 1941) and later opened their own private medical practices. The panel discussion includes doctors and nurses who graduated from Meharry Medical College.

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New Winston Museum & This School, This City – Monday, November 17, 2014

What Does it Mean to be Southern?

In connection with our current exhibition, “This School, This City,” New Winston Museum hosts a reading and panel discussion with local authors exploring Southern identity. Panelists include:

•Joseph Mills, Susan Burress Wall Distinguished Professor in the Humanities, University of North Carolina School of the Arts. Mills newest volume of poetry, his fifth with Press 53, is “This Miraculous Turning” (2014)

•Ed Southern, Winston-Salem native, writer of nonfiction and fiction, and executive director of North Carolina Writers’ Network. His first work of fiction, a collection of short stories set in the North Carolina Piedmont region, is “Parlous Angels” (Press 53, 2009).

•Cheryl Harry, Director of African American Programming, Old Salem Museum and Gardens; founder, Triad Cultural Arts, Inc. and author of “Winston-Salem’s African American Legacy” (Arcadia, 2013).

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New Winston Museum Salon Series – Thursday, October 23, 2014

Living Out Loud in Winston-Salem

In honor of National LGBTQ History Month, the NWM October Salon Series features a panel discussion with several outstanding advocates to explore the past accomplishments, joys and challenges facing the LGBTQ community in Winston-Salem. Panel participants include Teri Hairston, Gary Trowbridge and Frank Benedetti, Brent Morin and Li Hooper.

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New Winston Museum Salon Series – Thursday, September 25, 2014

Behind the scenes of This School, This City: Celebrating 50 Years of UNC School of the Arts in Winston-Salem

Exhibition co-curators Mike Wakeford, Division of Liberal Arts at UNCSA, and Chris Jordan, Director of Education and Programming at NWM, take you on a behind the scenes look at the truly collaborative process of “This School, This City: Celebrating 50 Years of UNC School of the Arts in Winston-Salem.”

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New Winston Museum Salon Series – Thursday, August 28, 2014

Author Charlie Lovett

A moderated discussion with Charlie Lovett, author of the New York Times Bestseller, “The Bookman’s Tale.” Charlie shares insights into his career as a writer and the influence of the people and places of Winston-Salem in his life’s work. Charlie also gives a brief look into the world of Jane Austen and his upcoming novel, “First Impressions.”

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New Winston Museum Salon Series – Thursday, July 24, 2014

The Yadkin Riverkeeper

Ken Lupton, Program Manager of Operation Medicine Cabinet at the Yadkin Riverkeeper, joins us to discuss the history of and how we can create a sustainable future for one of our most treasured local natural resources, the Yadkin River.

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New Winston Museum Salon Series – Thursday, June 26, 2014

“The Curator’s Dilemma(s)”

A behind-the-scenes glimpse at the curatorial process as Historians J. Eric Elliott, former resident of Winston-Salem and curator of exhibitions at the Spring House Restaurant and The Historic Brookstown Inn, and Chris Jordan, Director of Education and Programming at New Winston Museum, discuss the role of the curator in developing historical exhibitions. As New Winston Museum’s The War at Home exhibit nears the end of its run, we feel this is the perfect opportunity to engage the public and make visible many of the considerations, challenges, and decisions that are usually so carefully concealed in public exhibitions. From research to materials, and from political correctness to historical integrity, countless considerations both big and small must be addressed in any project. 

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New Winston Museum – The War at Home – June 10, 2014

Johnnie Pearson – “The Letters of Civil War Surgeon John F. Shaffner, M.D.”

Mr. Johnnie Pearson shares his research into local Civil War surgeon, Dr. John F. Shaffner of Salem. Dr. Shaffner, or “Frank” as he was called by friends and family, had just graduated from medical school in Pennsylvania when the Civil War broke out and he shared many of his experiences through letters written home. The surviving letters between Dr. Shaffner and his future wife, Caroline Fries, are numerous and offer a wealth of informative and poignant moments between two young Moravians separated by war. The War at Home is made possible in part by funding from the North Carolina Humanities Council, a statewide nonprofit and affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

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New Winston Museum Salon Series – May 22, 2014

Lynette Matthews-Murphy & John Bryan: “Restoration Drama”

Recognizing Historic Preservation Month, local business owners, Lynette Matthews Murphy of Spring House Restaurant, Kitchen and Bar and John Bryan of West End Mill Works, discuss the labor of love that goes into restoring dilapidated buildings into thriving businesses.  Part of National Historic Preservation Month events. 

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New Winston Museum – May 8, 2014

WS Writers Presents: “City Memoirs”

As part of National Historic Preservation Month, and in collaboration with Old Salem Museums & Gardens and Preserve Historic Forsyth, New Winston Museum hosts a panel discussion sponsored by Winston-Salem Writers. Panel includes local writers Cheryl Harry from Old Salem Museums & Gardens, Bill Pfefferkorn, and Al Perry from Winston-Salem Writers, Inc.

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New Winston Museum Salon Series – April 24, 2014

Leonard Clein, Richard Miller, & Jason Thiel: “Front and Center” – The Jewish influence on the development of Winston-Salem’s Downtown business district 

For over a century, this city has housed an active and influential Jewish community. During the economic boom of the late 19th Century, the first Jewish merchants began flocking to Winston-Salem and for generations, they would witness and guide the development of Winston-Salem’s downtown business district. Local residents Richard Miller and Leonard Clein, whose families played a significant role in this process, discuss the evolution and impact of the Jewish business community on Winston-Salem. Jason Thiel, executive director of the Downtown Winston-Salem Partnership will moderates this lively and informative discussion.

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New Winston Museum – The War at Home – April 11, 2014

Doug Butler: North Carolina’s Civil War Monuments

In conjunction with our current exhibition, The War at Home, North Carolina physician, scholar, and photographer, Douglas Butler, will present the fascinating history of  North Carolina’s Civil War monuments. Going beyond a survey of the state’s 109 Civil War commemorations, Dr. Butler’s book and presentation look at the shifting perspectives and trends that informed construction of the monuments. North Carolina Civil War Monuments: An Illustrated History (McFarland, 2013), is a carefully researched and fully documented book with photographs of each monument. The War at Home is made possible in part by funding from the North Carolina Humanities Council, a statewide nonprofit and affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

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New Winston Museum Salon Series – March 27, 2014

Breaking Down Barriers: Stories of Pioneering Women in the U.S. Military

In honor of Women’s History Month, we are celebrating by hosting two speakers, Ann Zuhr and Linday Bray, who will share personal stories of pioneering women in the military. As a member of the Women Airforce Service Pilots (WASP) program during World War II, Margery Moore Holben was one of the first women in United States history to fly military aircraft. Ann Zuhr, Margery’s daughter, will present her mother’s story of service and the struggle to gain recognition for the all but forgotten women of the WASP program. Linda Bray will share her own story as the first female to lead US troops in combat during the invasion of Panama in 1989. Bray will speak about her military experience and the sacrifices she made as a result of the immediate and at times unfair attention she received after the Panama operation.

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New Winston Museum – The War at Home – March 11, 2014

Phyllis Hoots: Civil War Unionism and Secret Societies in Forsyth County

In conjunction with our exhibition, The War at Home, local genealogical expert and historical scholar Phyllis Hoots will present her research into the wide-spread Unionism in Forsyth County during the Civil War. Though Forsyth County was officially a Confederate area, supplying large quantities of men and supplies to the Southern cause, there was locally an abundance of anti-Confederate activity. The support for such activity was so broad that in 1862 a Richmond paper labeled Forsyth “the hotbed of toryism.” Much of the Unionism was expressed through the clandestine meetings of secret societies, such as the Heroes of America or Red Strings. The War at Home is made possible in part by funding from the North Carolina Humanities Council, a statewide nonprofit and affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

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New Winston Museum Salon Series – February 27, 2014

Panel Discussion: The Local Arts Institution in 2014

 

Allison Perkins of Reynolda House, Mark Leach of SECCA, and Corey Madden of UNCSA’s Kenan Institute discuss the current and future roles of local art institutions.

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New Winston Museum – The War at Home – February 18, 2014

Philip Dunigan, Nola Knouse, Glenn Siebert: “Now the Battle din is O’er”

In collaboration with the Moravian Music Foundation, NWM hosts a performance of “When the Swallows Homeward Fly,” the title of the last music played for General Robert E. Lee on the night of the surrender at Appomattox. The music is performed with lyrics taken from a poem, written by the sister of a Confederate soldier, marking the end of the War. The program focuses on this song and on “Lorena,” the last piece played by the Band of the 26th Regiment North Carolina Troops during the final retreat of the Army of Northern Virginia. Performances of the two above-mentioned songs are by tenor Glenn Siebert, accompanied on the keyboard by Dr. Nola Reed Knouse.  Mr. Siebert is on the faculty of the UNC School of the Arts and music director of Home Moravian Church. Dr. Knouse is the Director of the Moravian Music Foundation.  Philip Dunigan, research advisor at the Moravian Music Foundation, provides commentary.

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New Winston Museum Salon Series – January 23, 2014

Panel Discussion: “A Community within a Community”

In partnership with the Society for the Study of Afro-American History (SSAAH), on Thursday January 23rd, New Winston Museum kicked off the 2014 Salon Series calendar with a discussion on Winston-Salem’s African American community prior to integration. Discussion panelists include: Dr. English Bradshaw; local artist Jerry Hanes; and Mrs. Linda Dark. Dr. Rosemary Millar, professor of African American Literature at UNCSA, moderates this discussion aimed at recognizing and exploring this community within a community.

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New Winston Museum – The War at Home – January 14, 2014

Eric Marshall: “History Lessons at Camp London”

In conjunction with our current exhibition, The War at Home, and in partnership with the Colonel Joseph Winston Chapter of the National Society Daughters of the American Revolution (NSDAR), NWM presents Stokes County educator Eric Marshall. Mr. Marshall has been featured on the CBS Evening News and in Our State Magazine for his passionate and innovative approaches to educating his fifth grade students about the Civil War.  The Colonel Joseph Winston Chapter of the NSDAR will present Mr. Marshall with a certificate recognizing him as the chapter’s selection as an Outstanding Teacher of American History; Marshall has also just been confirmed as the statewide NCSDAR winner of the Outstanding Teacher of American History award and will be nominated for the national award, to be announced in June 2014. New Winston Museum has invited Mr. Marshall to share his experiences and approaches to providing a meaningful history education. The War at Home is made possible in part by funding from the North Carolina Humanities Council, a statewide nonprofit and affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

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New Winston Museum Salon Series – August 8, 2013

Paula McCoy: “Better Blocks Ahead”

Paula McCoy of the Winston-Salem Funders Collaborative shares how local community development corporations (CDCs) are creating paths for social and economic vitality. 

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New Winston Museum Salon Series – May 9, 2013

Fam Brownlee: “The Golden Hyphen”

May 9, 2013 marks the 100th anniversary of the official consolidation of Winston and Salem. In honor of the historic event, local historian Fam Brownlee presents some of the lesser known history behind the coming together of the two towns, and the origins of the Twin City.

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New Winston Museum Salon Series – April 25, 2013

Jan Detter: “My Life as a Professional Artist in Winston-Salem”


Artist Jan Detter of Third Eye Studio discusses her life as an artist in Winston-Salem and the evolution of textiles as art.

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New Winston Museum Salon Series – April 11, 2013

Margaret Norfleet Neff, Eric Jackson, & David Bare: “Heirloom Gardening in Winston-Salem”

David Bare, Horticulturist with Reynolda Museums and Gardens; Eric Jackson, Horticulturist with Old Salem Museums and Gardens; and Margaret Norfleet Neff of Beta Verde speak on local heirloom gardening and seed preservation.

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New Winston Museum Salon Series – February 28, 2013

Maurice Pitts Johnson and David Gall: “Discovery in the Happy Hill Cemetary”

Mrs. Maurice Pitts Johnson and architect David Gall discuss restoration efforts at Winston-Salem’s historic Happy Hill Cemetery and the mystery surrounding the 2012 discovery of the remains of Winston-Salem’s Old City Hall, demolished in 1926.
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New Winston Museum Salon Series – February 14, 2013

Dr. Michele Gillespie: “The Reynolds’ Romance”

 

Wake Forest University history professor, Dr. Michele Gillespie speaks about her new book, “Katharine and R.J. Reynolds: Partners of Fortune Making in the New South,” and the romance between the pair. The lecture took place on February 14, 2013 and is New Winston Museums initial Salon Series event.

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