No automatic alt text available.

New Winston Museum and Forsyth Community Food Consortium present a book club meeting for Michael Twitty’s new book, “The Cooking Gene” in advance of his presentation for the New Winston Museum Salon Series that will follow on February 15. Michael Twitty is a food writer, independent scholar, culinary historian , and historical interpreter personally charged with preparing, preserving and promoting African American foodways and its parent traditions in Africa and her Diaspora and its legacy in the food culture of the American South. Michael is a Judaic studies teacher from the Washington D.C. Metropolitan area and his interests include food culture, food history, Jewish cultural issues, African American history and cultural politics.

RSVP for book club required, to: info@newwinston.org.

You will receive a 20% discount from Bookmarks if you purchase the “The Cooking Gene” from them. Bookmarks is located at 634 West Fourth Street #110, in downtown Winston-Salem, NC.

Michael Twitty’s blog: https://afroculinaria.com/
The Cooking Gene website: https://thecookinggene.com/
New Winston Museum “Foodways to Community” Salon Series:http://newwinston.org/visit/events/

About the Cooking Gene: A renowned culinary historian offers a fresh perspective on our most divisive cultural issue, race, in this illuminating memoir of Southern cuisine and food culture that traces his ancestry—both black and white—through food, from Africa to America and slavery to freedom.

Southern food is integral to the American culinary tradition, yet the question of who “owns” it is one of the most provocative touch points in our ongoing struggles over race. In this unique memoir, culinary historian Michael W. Twitty takes readers to the white-hot center of this fight, tracing the roots of his own family and the charged politics surrounding the origins of soul food, barbecue, and all Southern cuisine.

From the tobacco and rice farms of colonial times to plantation kitchens and backbreaking cotton fields, Twitty tells his family story through the foods that enabled his ancestors’ survival across three centuries. He sifts through stories, recipes, genetic tests, and historical documents, and travels from Civil War battlefields in Virginia to synagogues in Alabama to Black-owned organic farms in Georgia.

As he takes us through his ancestral culinary history, Twitty suggests that healing may come from embracing the discomfort of the Southern past. Along the way, he reveals a truth that is more than skin deep—the power that food has to bring the kin of the enslaved and their former slaveholders to the table, where they can discover the real America together.