New Winston Museum – The War at Home – January 14, 2014

Eric Marshall: “History Lessons at Camp London”

In conjunction with our current exhibition, The War at Home, and in partnership with the Colonel Joseph Winston Chapter of the National Society Daughters of the American Revolution (NSDAR), NWM presents Stokes County educator Eric Marshall. Mr. Marshall has been featured on the CBS Evening News and in Our State Magazine for his passionate and innovative approaches to educating his fifth grade students about the Civil War.  The Colonel Joseph Winston Chapter of the NSDAR will present Mr. Marshall with a certificate recognizing him as the chapter’s selection as an Outstanding Teacher of American History; Marshall has also just been confirmed as the statewide NCSDAR winner of the Outstanding Teacher of American History award and will be nominated for the national award, to be announced in June 2014. New Winston Museum has invited Mr. Marshall to share his experiences and approaches to providing a meaningful history education. The War at Home is made possible in part by funding from the North Carolina Humanities Council, a statewide nonprofit and affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities.


New Winston Museum – The War at Home – February 18, 2014

Philip Dunigan, Nola Knouse, Glenn Siebert: “Now the Battle din is O’er”

In collaboration with the Moravian Music Foundation, NWM hosts a performance of “When the Swallows Homeward Fly,” the title of the last music played for General Robert E. Lee on the night of the surrender at Appomattox. The music is performed with lyrics taken from a poem, written by the sister of a Confederate soldier, marking the end of the War. The program focuses on this song and on “Lorena,” the last piece played by the Band of the 26th Regiment North Carolina Troops during the final retreat of the Army of Northern Virginia. Performances of the two above-mentioned songs are by tenor Glenn Siebert, accompanied on the keyboard by Dr. Nola Reed Knouse.  Mr. Siebert is on the faculty of the UNC School of the Arts and music director of Home Moravian Church. Dr. Knouse is the Director of the Moravian Music Foundation.  Philip Dunigan, research advisor at the Moravian Music Foundation, provides commentary.


New Winston Museum – The War at Home – March 11, 2014

Phyllis Hoots: Civil War Unionism and Secret Societies in Forsyth County

In conjunction with our exhibition, The War at Home, local genealogical expert and historical scholar Phyllis Hoots will present her research into the wide-spread Unionism in Forsyth County during the Civil War. Though Forsyth County was officially a Confederate area, supplying large quantities of men and supplies to the Southern cause, there was locally an abundance of anti-Confederate activity. The support for such activity was so broad that in 1862 a Richmond paper labeled Forsyth “the hotbed of toryism.” Much of the Unionism was expressed through the clandestine meetings of secret societies, such as the Heroes of America or Red Strings. The War at Home is made possible in part by funding from the North Carolina Humanities Council, a statewide nonprofit and affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities.


New Winston Museum – The War at Home – April 11, 2014

Doug Butler: North Carolina’s Civil War Monuments

In conjunction with our current exhibition, The War at Home, North Carolina physician, scholar, and photographer, Douglas Butler, will present the fascinating history of  North Carolina’s Civil War monuments. Going beyond a survey of the state’s 109 Civil War commemorations, Dr. Butler’s book and presentation look at the shifting perspectives and trends that informed construction of the monuments. North Carolina Civil War Monuments: An Illustrated History (McFarland, 2013), is a carefully researched and fully documented book with photographs of each monument. The War at Home is made possible in part by funding from the North Carolina Humanities Council, a statewide nonprofit and affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities.


New Winston Museum – The War at Home – June 10, 2014

Johnnie Pearson – “The Letters of Civil War Surgeon John F. Shaffner, M.D.”

Mr. Johnnie Pearson shares his research into local Civil War surgeon, Dr. John F. Shaffner of Salem. Dr. Shaffner, or “Frank” as he was called by friends and family, had just graduated from medical school in Pennsylvania when the Civil War broke out and he shared many of his experiences through letters written home. The surviving letters between Dr. Shaffner and his future wife, Caroline Fries, are numerous and offer a wealth of informative and poignant moments between two young Moravians separated by war. The War at Home is made possible in part by funding from the North Carolina Humanities Council, a statewide nonprofit and affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities.